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      Chiredzi Rural District Council

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Water Pipe trenching laying of Pipes

In terms of water reticulation the Chiredzi Ruaral District Council is busy trenching the  lines in order to lay the pvc lines at buffalo range , so that water will be connected to residents.

 

Buffalo range road structure construction

In order to provide easy access to beneficiaries of the housing project, Chiredzi Rural District Council is working on the completion of the road structures. Roads in Buffalo Range are now on the levelling phase and the roads drainage's are still under construction.

Roads Construction

 

Roads Drainage

 

Culverts completed

 

 

Service of Radiator Reconditioning

 

RFQ/10/2019-SERVICE OF RADIATOR RECONDITIONING

REQUEST FOR QUOTATION

Chiredzi Rural District Council invites your company to make a firm offer for the service of radiator reconditioning

ITEM

DESCRIPTION

QUANTITY

1.

Radiator Reconditioning of a NP 300  y25 diesel

01

 

MANNER OF SUBMISSION

Offers not received by 10:00hrs on closing date will be treated as late tenders, rejected and returned to the tender. Late submission is 19/06/2019 after 1000HRS.Your offer should clearly indicate the following:

  1. Bidders must respond to specification and commercial terms on line by line basis without fail
  2. Bidders must state lead time/delivery period
  3. Bid validity period of which minimum should be 30 days from closing date must be firmly stated
  4. Bidders must attach proof of registration with Procurement Regulatory Authority of Zimbabwe in the form of copy of a Government Gazette.
  5. Bidders must attach a valid tax clearance
  6. Payment is done after delivery of the goods/service

Email  to slisenga@yahoo.com ; ceo@chiredzirdc.org

Service of Diesel Pump

RFQ/09/2019-SERVICE OF DIESEL PUMP

REQUEST FOR QUOTATION

Chiredzi Rural District Council invites your company to make a firm offer for the service of diesel pump

ITEM

DESCRIPTION

QUANTITY

1.

Repair of diesel pump

01

 

MANNER OF SUBMISSION

Offers not received by 10:00hrs on closing date will be treated as late tenders, rejected and returned to the tender. Late submission is 19/06/2019 after 1000HRS.Your offer should clearly indicate the following:

  1. Bidders must respond to specification and commercial terms on line by line basis without fail
  2. Bidders must state lead time/delivery period
  3. Bid validity period of which minimum should be 30 days from closing date must be firmly stated
  4. Bidders must attach proof of registration with Procurement Regulatory Authority of Zimbabwe in the form of copy of a Government Gazette.
  5. Bidders must attach a valid tax clearance
  6. Payment is done after delivery of the goods/service

Email  to slisenga@yahoo.com ; ceo@chiredzirdc.org

 

Server Repairs

 

RFQ/08/2019-SERVER REPAIRS

REQUEST FOR QUOTATION

Chiredzi Rural District Council invites your company to make a firm offer for the service of server- power cut failure

ITEM

DESCRIPTION

QUANTITY

1.

Repairs of a server- power cut failure

 

You may visit Chiredzi Rural District Council Offices to ascertain the scope of works

01

 

MANNER OF SUBMISSION

Offers not received by 10:00hrs on closing date will be treated as late tenders, rejected and returned to the tender. Late submission is 19/06/2019 after 1000HRS.Your offer should clearly indicate the following:

  1. Bidders must respond to specification and commercial terms on line by line basis without fail
  2. Bidders must state lead time/delivery period
  3. Bid validity period of which minimum should be 30 days from closing date must be firmly stated
  4. Bidders must attach proof of registration with Procurement Regulatory Authority of Zimbabwe in the form of copy of a Government Gazette.
  5. Bidders must attach a valid tax clearance
  6. Payment is done after delivery of the goods/service

Email  to slisenga@yahoo.com ; ceo@chiredzirdc.org

 

Food and Agriculture Organisation Projects in Chiredzi

For years now, rural communities in the South Eastern Lowveld have been adversely affected by food insecurity due poor rains. Natural disasters like floods, drought and epidemic diseases were also immensely contributory to the loss of human lives and domestic animals between 2008 and 2009. The situation saw many people crossing the river Limpopo to the neighbouring South Africa to look for greener pastures, leaving their large tracks of lands behind. This had also seen poor access to portable water hence the emergency of epidemic diseases like cholera. Very remote places like Malipati, Dhavhata and Pahlela were profusely disadvantaged by the drought since crops and cattle were devastated.  

However this drew the attention of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) to enhance the lives of the people in wards 13, 14 and 15 of Chiredzi District. The project being Elnino Drought Response was aimed at the provision of clean water through the rehabilitation of boreholes in the respective wards. It was also aimed at the promotion of agricultural projects through the establishment of solar-powered gardens. The project saw 50 boreholes being rehabilitated and the setting up of 7 solar-powered gardens. As a local authority Chiredzi Rural District Council worked closely with the District Water and Sanitation Sub Committee (DWSSC) in the implementation of the project.

In interviews with some beneficiaries in wards 13, 14 and 15, they testify that the project actually brought a sigh of relief to their lives. To date, about 120 households benefit from the Manjinji Garden Scheme in Malipati ward 15. The garden has vegetables, tomatoes and maize grown for business at Malipati Business Centre. Cephas Muchini is an 80 year old beneficiary whose main interest is in farming. He does subsistence farming on his 3 hectare fertile land specialising in small grains due to little rains received in region 5. It was only in 2016 when he managed to produce for commercial purposes. Muchini explains that the Elnino Drought Response project has changed his life positively. He can now get the money to pay school fees for his grandchild and for other basic needs. By the way Muchini lives with wife Selina Chali and one grandchild Thomas and all the children have left for jobs in South Africa.

Before the intervention, the old man`s life was hard since he and his cattle used to walk about 4 km to get water from Mwenezi River. Now that a nearby borehole with a water trough is up and running, his family and cattle can get water any time.  

“It wasn’t easy at all; we had to walk long distances to get water since many boreholes were malfunctioning. I am happy that the boreholes are now functioning. I am also benefiting from the Manjinji Garden Scheme so I want to thank FAO and those involved in the implementation of the project” said Muchini with his eyes filled with genuine compassion. 

 Interactions with various communities in these three wards indicate that there are many profitable projects planned. In Pahlela ward 13, the community members have begun vegetable garden projects using water from the boreholes rehabilitated by the project. These communities also run a garden project using solar powered garden with a 10 000 litre tank. They target Chikombedzi Growth Point and they say that the garden has boosted business opportunities in the whole ward. Apart from garden projects, some have taken advantage of the boreholes and started moulding bricks for sale hence earning a living. The intervention of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations in the South Eastern Lowveld proved to be highly successful and fruitful as evidenced by the development in wards 13, 14 and 15.

Open DFD

OPEN DEFECATION FREE CAMPAIGN IN CHIREDZI DISTRICT

For years, African communities with the inclusion of Chiredzi have been adversely affected by diarrhoeal diseases that are responsible for the deaths of thousands of people in Zimbabwe. These deaths are mainly attributed to unclean water sources, shortages of sanitation facilities and other unhygienic living conditions.

In 2008, ward 20 of Chiredzi also succumbed to severe cholera pandemic which claimed lives of 50 community members. This saw many people in the affected communities incurring costs in a bid to have their affected friends and relatives treated. The government through Rural WASH Project with the aid of UNICEF and its implementing partner German Agro Action (GAA) took it upon itself to trigger communities in ward 20 on the importance of safe disposal ofhuman waste and drinking from clean water sources. This was done in order to instil behavioural and attitude change on the part of communities in ward 20.

Village 2B, 5B1 and 5B2 are a cluster of villages, with a total of 58 households, in ward 20 that heeded the call and formed sanitation action groups in each village to help push villagers to construct their own toilets and the upholding of general hygiene in the area. The villagers constructed toilets using their own funds and internal saving and money lending (mukando) played a major role in helping them achieve ODF status. Each village held celebrations congratulating themselves on achieving ODF status. 2B Glendevon were the first to attain ODF status in the cluster and to hold the celebrations. The celebrations had a spill over effect on the rest of the cluster, which encouraged them to follow suit hence it’s now an ODF free zone.

The clusters of villages have now been declared an open defecation free zone and the community had to build a billboard as a means to market their newly achieved status. The billboard also serves as a warning to visitors who visit the village not to practise open defecation.

The government on the 25th of May 2016 with the aid of UNICEF also chipped in to assist the villagers in ward 20 by constructing a borehole in village 2B Glendevon.The borehole caters for 149 households.

The villagers now have clean sources of drinking water and have constructed hand washing facilities (tip tap) around their homesteads. The villagers also came up with methods on how they were going to sustain their newly achieved status.

As one of the methods, they were going to continue with internal lending and saving (mukando) to assist them in the construction oflatrines that could have been damaged by natural or unnatural causes. They also came up with a constitution that stipulates waste management of the villages, and has penalties for those that breach the constitution.

ODF billboard

In interviews with some villagers in ward 20, they thanked the local authority, Chiredzi Rural District Council for the unwavering support. Ward 20 councillor Yeukai Matsaure thanked the local authority saying that it has been highly instrumental in the fight against cholera and other hygiene related diseases.

“Ini sa councillor ndakamirira ward 20, ndinoda kutenda CRDC nechido chavo kusimudzira ward yedu especially kune zveutano nekurwisana nemanyoka” said Matsaure.

Mrs Mukaro conferring ODF certificate to Maware village

Alternatively another ODF celebration ceremony was held to honour villagers in Maware for having attained ODF status. Chiredzi Rural District Council environmental health officer Mrs Mukaro facilitated the occasion and she conferred a certificate to the village. In her speech, she urged the community members in the village to continue working together in a bid to build more toilets as a means to curb hygiene related diseases.

However villagers who gathered for the ceremony expressed their joy and appreciation towards their ODF status. The event was characterised by music and dances, with pupils from Ruware Primary School providing entertainment in form of drama, traditional dance and poetry.

Takudzwa Majoko is a grade five pupil at Ruware Primary who recited a poem highlighting the importance of toilets in the community.

 

Catherine Chauke NFI Beneficiary

RESTORING HOPE FOR RURAL WATER SUPPLY

Ward 8 is one of the wards in Chiredzi district that succumbed to cholera in 2009. Drought also emerged as a menace, having left Chibwedziva struck by food insecurity and drinking water became a serious challenge. It was also affected by wild animals from Gonarezhou National Park and the situation promoted food insecurity since crops and domestic animals were destroyed by wild animal’s hence insuperable problems. As a result, this place was also left with limited hygiene promotion escalating cases of diarrhoea, cholera and eventually deaths.

However in a bid to mitigate such cases, the government of Zimbabwe through its international partners (PEPFAR) has taken a centre stage in the provision of non-food items (NFIs) to 451 beneficiaries in ward 8 with Chibwedziva inclusive. The project is being managed by UNICEF and German Agro Action as an implementing partner. As a local authority, Chiredzi Rural District Council has worked very hard in monitoring WASH projects in Chiredzi district. Apart from monitoring, CRDC also takes a centre stage in the mitigation of hygiene related diseases through various projects. 

Catherine Chauke is a 70 year old blind woman from Chibwedziva ward 8 of Chiredzi who benefited from the NFIs distributed under this project

Catherine Chauke at her home in Chibwedziva, ward 8 of Chiredzi

Since she lost her sight for about 8 years, she lives with her grandchild called Chenai as her care giver and her son who is mentally disturbed. She received 18 strips of Aqua tablets, 1 jerrycan, 1 bucket with a tap, 6 bars of soap and IEC materials. Catherine explains that she is grateful as she received Aqua tablets for water treatment and that will help her drink safe water. She makes it clear that she never had a bucket to store drinking water before. She also understands well on the use of the water treating tablets she got.

“Ndakawana chigubhu chekucheresa mvura, bucket, sipo ne mapepa ekuverenga maerano nezveutano naizvozvo ndinotenda kanzuro ye CRDC nevainoshanda navo pachirongwa ichi”, said Catherine with her lips trembling.

Since she got soap, the old woman says she prefers washing her hands frequently, and she can grope for a soap when her grandchild is away. It is profusely hear trending when she shares her story that she used to suffer from severe diarrhoea, a problem emanating from the water she used to drink before she got the Aqua tablets for water treatment.

“Ndaigaro nzwakurirarira mudumbu mangu zvese nemanyoka, ndava imvura yandaimwa”, lamented Catherine wiping tears on her left eye.

She also makes sure that her grandchild cleans all the kitchen utensils using soap for the improvement of hygiene.

Chenai uses a 20 litre jerry can to ferry water from a next door neighbour`s well, approximately 800 metres away from their homestead and she closes with a lid to avoid contamination during transportation. Since Catherine got a 20 litre bucket with a tap, her grandchild stores water and makes sure she drops 2 Aqua tablets and waits for about 30 minutes and then uses a tap to extract the water. Incredibly, Catherine says she can tell whether the water is treated or not, and she says it feels healthy drinking treated water.

With the bars of soap she got, she took some for her mentally challenged son and Chenai. Chenai had an unwanted pregnancy and she had a child, one of the reasons her grandmother gave her some bars of soap for a healthy baby care. She also uses soap to wash hands. Chenai left school at a very early stage, but she frequently reads the IECs for her grandmother and also for her to understand more about hygiene, Catherine confirms.

 Chenai washing kitchen utensils with soap

“Ndinogeza maoko ndabva ku toilet uye muzukuru wangu anondiverengera zvakanyorwa pamapepa iwaya achindiudza nezvekushambidzika. Ndave neruzivo kuti ndinofanirwa kugeza maoko angu nguva dzese”, said Catherine before she takes a deep sigh.

The IEC materials have various tips on them about hand washing, food preparation, prevention of diarrhoeal diseases among other hygiene tips.

Ostensibly, the members of the community in Chibwedziva have whole heartedly embraced the programme and they seem to have understood that it is aimed at improving lives through hygiene.

Rupangwana Piped Water Scheme

RUPANGWANA PIPED WATER SCHEME BETTERS LIVES IN WARD 3 AND 4

Taking a leaf from the great Lao Tzu, “nothing is softer or more flexible than water, yet nothing can resist it”. It is however undisputable that water is central in every aspect of life. With their proximity to the river Save, ward 3 and 4 have had many cholera cases and other hygiene related diseases recorded emanating from the consumption of contaminated water from the river. Apart from the consumption of contaminated water, many villagers also relied on their unprotected wells for drinking water, thus the inevitability of hygiene related diseases.

In a bid to reduce such cases, the community members implored for the resuscitation of boreholes in the community. In 2012, Chiredzi Rural District Council in conjunction with Rural WASH however responded and two water tanks were installed at Rupangwana clinic aimed at supplying safe water to the clinics, schools and the communities. Hence Rupangwana Piped Water Scheme emerged as the brainchild of UNICEF.

The project has UNICEF in the forefront and Christian Care as an implementing partner. The District Water and Sanitation SubCommittee (DWSSC) in conjunction with Chiredzi Rural District Council proved to be highly instrumental through their close monitoring. In 2014, German Agro Action, took part in the installation of two water tanks at Rupangwana and each tank having the capacity of 5000 litres. Simultaneously, the District Development Fund (DDF) provided a diesel water pump and the whole system was supposed to cater for Masekesa, Jekero, Chikate and Rupangwana. The pump eventually developed a technical fault and it was in a condition that attracted finances for it to be repaired. In 2016 the engine completely went off and the community members failed to mobilise funds to repair or to replace the pump.

In September 2017, the project reached its peak when Pump Systems Africa was contracted by Christian Care to rehabilitate and upgrade the Piped Water Scheme, with more water tanks being installed around Rupangwana.  The diesel engine was replaced by a new submersible solar pump system (Lorentz 5.4 HP).

Tanks at Rupangwana clinic

There was a huge expansion in the pipes with many villages being provided with safe drinking water. The whole system was upgraded and a metre to monitor the consumption of water was put in place. Initially, the consumers were being affected in times of pipe burst since it forced the whole system to be blocked due to shortages of control valves.

However this project saw many lives around Rupangwana and other areas in ward 2 and 3 being saved. Cholera cases have been reduced and only one case of cholera was recorded in 2017, unlike 10 recorded in 2016. With most of the African communities being patriarchal, the women suffer most as they travel long distances to get water for the families.

In some villages around Rupangwana, many people had to walk long distances of about 1.5 km for them to get water, chiefly from Save river. However the Piped Water Scheme made their lives easier as they can get safe water from the taps installed in their villages.

Jekero Primary School also benefited from the project and the school now has a double tap where they can get safe water anytime they need it. Tatenda is a grade 5 pupil at Jekero Primary and he commended the Piped Water Scheme saying that it has brought better life and piped water is far much better and it is safe

“It wasn’t easy for the pupils here to be getting water from a borehole and sometimes it needed much power to pump water. The piped water is healthy and it is generally safe, so life is good now”, said Tatenda.

In addition, as a result of the Piped Water Scheme, the community members have planned to start a nutritional garden as a means to sustain their families. In interviews with some villagers, they vividly explained that they have initiated money making projects like vegetable production targeting Rupangwana business centre.

Amos Mashamba is one of the villagers in Rupangwana who finds his life positively changed through the Piped Water Scheme. He explains that since money is very hard to come by in the rural areas, through the nutritional garden it is very easy for them to be making money.

Pupils at Jekero School fetching water at a new tap

 

SAFE WATER FOR A BETTER COMMUNITY

Ward 8 is one of the wards in Chiredzi district that succumbed to Cholera in 2009. Drought (2014-16) also emerged as a menace,having left Chibwedziva struck by food insecurity and drinking water became a serious challenge. It was also affected by wild animals fromGonarezhou National Park and the situation promoted food insecurity since cropsand domestic animals weredestroyed by wild animals hence insuperable problems. As a result, this place was also left with limited hygiene promotion escalating cases of diarrhoea, cholera and eventually deaths.

However in a bid to mitigate such cases,the government of Zimbabwe through its international partners (PEPFAR) has taken a centre stage in the provision ofnon-food items (NFIs) to 451 beneficiaries in ward 8 with Chibwedziva inclusive.The project is being managed by UNICEF and Welthungerhilfe (GAA) as an implementing partner.

Catherine Chauke is a 70 year old blind woman from Chibwedziva ward 8 of Chiredzi South who benefited from the NFIs distributed under this project.Catherine Chauke at her home in Chibwedziva, ward 8 Chiredzi South

Since she lost her sight for about 8 years,she lives with  her grandchild namely Chenai as her care giver and her son who is mentally disturbed.She received 18 strips of Aqua tablets,1 jerrycan,1 bucket with a tap , 6 bars of soap and IEC materials.Catherine explains that she is grateful as she received Aquatablets for water treatment and that will help her drink safe water.She makes it clear that she never had a bucket to store drinking water.She also understands well on the use of the water treating tablets she got,and this is what she had to say;

“Ndakapiwasipo,chigubhu ne bucket rekuisa mvura yandinomwayakachengetedzeka.Zvekarendakabatsirikanekutihakunakumwekwandaizowanarubatsirorwakadai”,said Catherine with her lips trembling.

Since she got soap,the woman says she prefers washing her hands frequently, hence she can grope for a soap when her grandchild Chenai is away.It is profusely heartrending when she shares her story that she used to suffer from severe diarrhoea, a problem emanating from the water she used to drink before she got the Aqua tablets for water treatment.

“Ndaigaronzwakurirariramudumbumanguzvesenemanyoka,ndavaimvurayandimwa”,lamented Catherinewiping tears on her left eye.

She also makes sure that her grandchild cleans all the kitchen utensils using soap for the improvement of hygiene.Chenai washing kitchen utensils with soap

The 20 litre jerry can given to Catherine is used by Chenai to ferry water from a next door neighbour`s well,approximately 800 metres awayfrom their homestead and she closes with a lid to avoid contaminationduring transportation.Since Catherine got a 20 litre bucket with a tap,her grandchild stores water and makes sure she drops 2 Aqua tablets then the water becomes potable after 30 minutes and the tap is used to extract.Incredibly,Catherine says she can tell whether the water is treated or not,and she says it feels healthy drinking treated water than raw water from unprotected well.

With the bars of soap she got,she took some for  her mentally challenged son and  Chenai. Chenai had an unwanted pregnancy and she  has a child,one of the reasons her grandmother gave her  soap for a healthy baby care.She also uses soap to wash hands.Chenai left school at a very early stage,but she frequently reads the  IECsfor her grandmother and also for her to understand more about hygiene,Catherine confirms.

“Ndinogezamaokondabveku toilet uyemuzukuruwanguanondiverengerazvakanyorwapamapepaiwayaachindiudzanezvekushmbidzika.Ndaveneruzivokutindinofanirwakugezamaokoangunguvadzese” ,said Catherine before she takes a deep sigh.

They have various tips on them about hand washing,food preparation,prevention of diarrhoeal diseases among other hygiene tips.

Ostensibly,the members of the community in Chibwedziva have wholeheartedly embraced the government`s projects and they seem to have understood that this project is aimed at improving their hygienic conditions in and around their homesteads.

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Tourism Sites & Package

Proposal Tourism sites

There is need to construct Hotels , Lodges or Camp sites along the Great Limpopo Transfontier Conservation Area. Partnerships with communities can be welcome. 

Sangwe Corridor                           Game viewing/ lodges/bird watching and sport hunting

Persvi gorgeConstruction of lodges / chalets
Sakala LodgeConstruction of chalets
Nyakasikana dam  Construction of chalets
Mashawi HotspringConstruction of chalets

Matibi 2 Communal land

Chipinda poolsConstruction of chalets/ Campsite
Naivasha MhlanguleniNaivasha Mhlanguleni

Sangwe Communal Land

Nwa ChingulanaConstruction of lodges
Ndali entry point in Gonarezhou National ParkConstruction of Campsite
Chingoji Hot SpringConstruction of chalets/ lodges

Tourism package

  1. Free lease fee for developing Chalet for 5 years and 7 years for developing lodges
  2. No payment of development levy
  3. No payment of licence levy for 5 years for chalets and 7 years for lodges
  4. Free charge of royalties that is collection of river sand , pit sand and stones

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